Sustainability with Teacher Support Modules

Over the last few months, I've been overseeing the Child Protection and Education Departments for the International Rescue Committee in Turkey/Northern Syria. One of the main areas of technical development that I worked on was the Teacher Support Model that was being employed by the teams. The Teacher Support Model that I defined/refined/developed/trained the teams on included: Teacher Learning Circles, Teacher Mentoring, and Teacher Classroom Observations. Derived from solid research highlighting the fact that sustained professional development increases change/improved pedagogical practice from 10% to 80% in research studies, I was focused on building in modules that could be implemented remotely, in a complex, cross-border EiE context (Northern Syria/Idlib province). These modules focused on peer-to-peer development, peer-to-mentor development, and standardized, quanitified observations to assess status change over a fixed baseline/endline. While we were paying the staff involved in this Teacher Support Model (IRC staff, teachers, head teachers), a big question of sustainaibility kept arising....ie: if we removed our monetary support vis-a-vis support salaries (and job requirements), would these technical aspects be strong enough to stand up and be sustained? Do teachers and head teachers value these components enough to "volunteer" their time to continue them if they are not being paid? What are the feasible aspects that are sustainable, and what are the key takeaways for sustainability (technial complexity, incentives)? I'll be ruminating on this topic of applicability, sustainability, and feasability in the coming weeks.....